Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

New protocol for outbreaks of CEM
Taylorella equigenitalis, the bacterium that causes CEM, can be passed through natural mating and artificial insemination.
Highly contagious disease remains ‘a very real threat’

A new protocol has been implemented for controlling future outbreaks of contagious equine metritis (CEM) in England, Scotland and Wales.

Suspected cases must still be reported to the APHA, but the owners of affected horses will now be able to use a private equine veterinary surgeon - who has been specifically approved to deal with the disease - without official movement restrictions being imposed.

This arrangement requires compliance with control measures outlined in the Horserace Betting Levy Board’s code of practice for CEM. All associated costs will continue to be covered by the horse owner.

Taylorella equigenitalis, the bacterium that causes CEM, can be passed through natural mating and artificial insemination. It causes sub-fertility in affected mares and stallions can carry it without showing clinical signs, leading to chronic infection.

The new protocol was developed by the Equine Disease Coalition, which is chaired by World Horse Welfare and comprises representatives from the APHA, Animal Health Trust, BEVA, Defra and devolved administrations, Nottingham vet school, RSPCA and RVC.

BEVA chief executive David Mountford said: “Whilst occurrences of CEM are sporadic and we have not had any confirmed cases in the UK since 2012, it still presents a very real threat to our breeding industry.   

“Ensuring cases are treated and managed by an approved veterinary surgeon, who is fully versed in the HBLB Code of Practice, guarantees that the appropriate provisions will be taken in order to safeguard our world class breeding population.”

Professor Sidney Ricketts, joint veterinary adviser for the Thoroughbred Breeders Association, warned that while there have not been any UK cases for a number of years - largely because of compliance with the HBLB code of practice - infections are regularly found in many other countries.

“So there is a continued risk from carrier or infected mares or stallions being imported into the UK,” he added. “The new control measures are a vital tool in helping manage this risk.” 

The AHT will have a central role in the protocol, co-ordinating activities undertaken by approved vets, receiving and collating reports, initiating tracing processes off affected premises and taking responsibility for epidemiological investigations.

Horse owners and laboratories should report suspected cases to the Defra Rural Services helpline, on 03000 200 310.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Huge spike in ‘designer’ dogs going into rescue

News Story 1
 The RSPCA has reported a huge spike in the number of ‘designer’ dogs arriving into its care.

Figures published by the charity show there has been a 517 per cent increase in the number of French bulldogs arriving into its kennels. During that time, the charity has also seen an increase in dachshunds, chihuahuas, and crossbreeds.

RSPCA dog welfare expert Lisa Hens said: “We know that the breeds of dog coming into our care often reflect the trends in dog ownership in the wider world and, at the moment, it doesn’t get more trendy than ‘designer’ dogs like French bulldogs and Dachshunds."

 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
AHDB Pork calls for stepped-up biosecurity

Pig farmers are being urged to step up biosecurity to reduce the risk of swine dysentery in their herds.

According to Farmers Weekly, AHDB Pork have confirmed cases in the north and east of the UK and is calling on producers to focus on hygiene to protect their animals.

Members of the AHDB Pork Significant diseases charter are reported to have been informed of the outbreaks.