Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
Send Cancel

Horse Trust joins Animal Behaviour and Training Council
The Horse Trust will help to promote the use of safe, effective and humane methods of training and behaviour modification.
Charity to advise on safe and effective methods of equine training

The world’s oldest equine charity has become the first equine-focussed Advisory Member of the Animal Behaviour and Training Council (ABTC).

The Horse Trust provides respite and retirement to working horses across the UK that have experienced cruelty and neglect. It also provides training for professionals working on the frontline of horse welfare, such as the police and local authority inspectors.

As a member of the ABTC, the Horse Trust will help to promote the use of safe, effective and humane methods of training and behaviour modification for horses. Currently, anyone can call themselves a behaviourist, making it difficult for owners and riders to get the right knowledge and advice.

Commenting on the move, Liane Preshaw, director of knowledge and skills at The Horse Trust, said she would like to see more trainers and behaviourists meeting the ABTC’s standards and becoming accredited.

“This will ensure the trainer/behaviourist understands the importance of ruling out pain or discomfort as a cause of unwanted behaviours, the need to ensure the horse’s needs are met and the impact on the horse’s behaviour if they aren’t, and how to train horses optimally by understanding how they learn,” she said.

“We would like to encourage more equine professionals to develop their knowledge and skills so that they can help safeguard the psychological health of our horses.”

The ABTC is the regulatory body that represents animal trainers and animal behaviour therapists to the legislative and public bodies. It sets and maintains standards of practical skills and knowledge needed to be a behaviourist, training instructor or animal therapist. It also maintains the national register of appropriately-qualified individuals.

David Montgomery, president of the ABTC, said “Our understanding of welfare issues associated with all animal training and behaviour interventions has grown enormously over the years and with it the need to establish and promote standards that reflect best practice.

“The ABTC has made significant progress towards this goal with smaller companion animals and is therefore delighted to broaden its scope into the equine world with the support of the Horse Trust.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Charity reveals it treated thousands of pets with dental issues last year

News Story 1
 Battersea Dogs & Cats Home has revealed that its veterinary team performs dental procedures on more than 170 animals every month. Last year the charity says it extracted hundreds of teeth from more than 800 animals and carried out thousands of routine scales and polishes.

To combat the problem, Battersea is urging pet owners to get regular dental checks at their vets, implement a daily oral care routine, feed a good dental chew and only give toys that are designed for dogs, including gentle rubber toys that are less wearing on the teeth. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Voting opens for RCVS council elections

Eligible veterinary surgeons can now vote in this year’s RCVS Council elections. Four out of the 10 candidates are already on council and are standing for re-election: David Catlow, Mandisa Greene, Neil Smith, Susan Paterson. The remaining six candidates are not currently on council: John C Davies, Karlien Heyman, John Innes, Thomas Lonsdale, Matthew Plumtree and Iain Richards.

Further information on the candidates can be found on the RCVS website: