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Equine health survey highlights dental problems
The survey found that 54 per cent of horses with dental problems were treated by a veterinary surgeon.
Dental disease a common issue for horses in the UK

The importance of raising awareness of equine dental disease has been flagged up in the latest National Equine Health Survey (NEHS).

The NEHS annual snapshot, conducted by the Blue Cross in conjunction with the BEVA, quizzed 5,235 people and returned records for 15,433 horses. Dental disease emerged as a significant problem for horses in the UK, with 841 suffering from trouble with their teeth.

The issue was the sixth most frequently recorded individual disease syndrome in the survey. A total of 54 per cent of horses with dental problems were treated by a veterinary surgeon and 46 per cent received attention from an equine dental technician.

The survey also shows that just over 90 per cent of horses received regular dental checks, with around two-thirds receiving annual checks and one third receiving checks every six months. Commenting on the findings, equine vet Dr Wendy Talbot from Zoetis UK said:

“It is tricky to know if a horse has dental problems because you can’t see inside the mouth and often there won’t be any obvious symptoms. This is why regular check-ups are so important. It’s reassuring to see that a high percentage of horses are receiving regular dental checks.”

The top five disease syndromes recorded by the NEHS 2017 were skin diseases, lameness, metabolic diseases, eye problems and gastrointestinal problems.

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UK a step closer to ivory ban

News Story 1
 A UK ban on ivory sales is one step closer to coming into force, as the government has introduced the Ivory Bill to parliament. The ban covers items of all ages, rather than just ivory carved after 1947. Anyone breaching the ban will face an unlimited fine or up to five years in jail.

Conservationists have welcomed the bill, which comes less than six weeks after the government published the results of a consultation on this issue. Around 55 African elephants are now slaughtered for their ivory every day and the illegal wildlife trade is estimated to be worth £17 billion a year.  

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Strategic alliance to support development of agri-food sector

The Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI) and Queen’s University Belfast have formed a new strategic alliance that will see both institutions form a research and education partnership.

Under the agreement, the organisations will pool their resources and expertise to support the development of the agri-food sector. It will work across three core themes: enabling innovation, facilitating new ways of working and partnerships.