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Animal welfare a top food concern, survey finds
Animal welfare was listed as a top food concern in the FSA's Biannual Public Attitudes Tracker.

FSA survey monitors changes in consumer attitudes

Animal welfare has been named one of the top food issues of concern in the Food Standards Agency’s Biannual Public Attitudes Tracker.

The survey, conducted with consumers across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, monitors changes in consumer attitudes towards the FSA and food-related issues.

Amongst the top food issues of concern is the amount of sugar in food, food waste, food prices and animal welfare. Respondents also raised concerns about food hygiene when eating out, food poisoning, food additives and chemicals from the environment.

Forty-five per cent of respondents reported a concern about food safety in UK restaurants, pubs, cafes and takeaways, whilst 42 per cent of respondents reported a concern about food safety in UK shops and supermarkets.

The survey also revealed that the majority of people trust that food is what it says it is and that it is accurately labelled (74 per cent).

Salmonella and E-coli were by far the most commonly known types of food poisoning (total awareness of 89 per cent and 82 per cent respectively). The perceived most likely sources of food poisoning were raw chicken or turkey (79 per cent), followed by shellfish (54 per cent), reheated take-away food (47 per cent) and eggs (38 per cent).

The survey took place in November 2017 with a representative sample of 1,989 adults. 

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UK a step closer to ivory ban

News Story 1
 A UK ban on ivory sales is one step closer to coming into force, as the government has introduced the Ivory Bill to parliament. The ban covers items of all ages, rather than just ivory carved after 1947. Anyone breaching the ban will face an unlimited fine or up to five years in jail.

Conservationists have welcomed the bill, which comes less than six weeks after the government published the results of a consultation on this issue. Around 55 African elephants are now slaughtered for their ivory every day and the illegal wildlife trade is estimated to be worth £17 billion a year.  

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News Shorts
Strategic alliance to support development of agri-food sector

The Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI) and Queen’s University Belfast have formed a new strategic alliance that will see both institutions form a research and education partnership.

Under the agreement, the organisations will pool their resources and expertise to support the development of the agri-food sector. It will work across three core themes: enabling innovation, facilitating new ways of working and partnerships.