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Equine charity granted special UN status
Brooke has worked with FAO since 2011, but is now a formally recognised partner.
Brooke will have more input into working equid policy  

Equine charity Brooke will have greater input into policy affecting working horses, donkeys and mules at UN level, after being granted specialised consultative status with the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO).

Brooke is the first equine charity to receive this status. Whilst it has worked with FAO since 2011, the charity is now a formally recognised partner.

In 2018 and beyond, Brooke will work more directly with the FAO, attending key meetings and conferences as experts on working equids. It will also submit suggestions to the director general, on programmes and policies that directly affect these animals and the communities that depend upon them.

The charity said its status offers a new way to put animal welfare on the global policy agenda, and strengthens its voice on working animals in UN agricultural and food security policy.

So far this year, Brooke has also rolled out the second version of its BrookeCheck tablet app to staff in India, Pakistan, Ethiopia, Senegal and Kenya.

The app was originally used to measure the animals’ emotional and physical wellbeing. Now, it can also monitor how people interact with the animals, as well as the work of local vets, farriers and other healthcare providers.

Additionally, it contains resources such as videos showing handling techniques, symptoms of common health issues and body condition illustrations. It can be used offline, which facilitates its use in remote locations.

So far, Brooke has completed nearly 30,000 welfare, owner and service assessments in the past year.

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 A new free app will support vital work in clinics caring for stray dogs around the world, experts say. Created by the University of Edinburgh, the tool allows vets to track the wellbeing of dogs going through catch-neuter-return schemes, which are common in countries with large numbers of strays.

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