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Hare coursing operation makes ‘positive progress’
Lincolnshire Police has a policy of seizing dogs to tackle hare coursing.

Almost 50 dogs seized in Operation Galileo

A police operation to tackle hare coursing  has made ‘positive progress’, according to Lincolnshire Police.

Operation Galileo is Lincolnshire Police’s response to hare coursing and its link to threats, intimidation, damage and road safety. According to the force, some 2000 incidents of hare coursing were reported by local communities during the last season.

In December, there were 324 incidents of hare coursing, compared to 413 in December 2016. In the four months from September to December, there have been a total of 1014, compared to 1216 in the same period in 2016.

Deputy chief constable Craig Naylor said: “This is positive progress. We will continue to work with our partners including the Crown Prosecution Service and RSPCA to ensure that we explore all opportunities for enforcement.

“We work with the NFU and CLA to seek feedback on our activity and develop our tactics. We can only succeed with the continued help and information from our rural communities."

Chief superintendent Mark Housley added: "I believe that our policy of seizing dogs is the most effective deterrent for hare coursers. So far this season we have seized 49 dogs.

“We have heard from other forces that hare coursers they encounter tell them they will not visit Lincolnshire because we seize dogs. This policy will continue."

Lincolnshire Police said that seized dogs are cared for in approved kennels and that they apply for the court for forfeiture on conviction.

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Vets save premature penguin chick

News Story 1
 Vets have saved a tiny Humboldt penguin chick after her egg was accidentally broken by her parents. Keepers at ZSL London Zoo were shocked to find the chick, named Rainbow, still alive and rushed her straight to the Zoo’s on-site veterinary clinic.

It was a little way to go until the chick should have hatched, so the process was touch and go. Vets removed bits of shell from around the chick with tweezers until she could be lifted out and placed in a makeshift nest.

Rainbow is now in a custom-built incubation room where she spends her days cuddled up to a toy penguin. Keepers will hand-fed Rainbow for the next 10 weeks until she is healthy enough to move to the penguin nursery.  

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BVA infographic to help shoppers understand farm assurance schemes

An infographic to help members of the public understand farm assurance schemes has been produced by the BVA. The infographic outlines BVA’s priorities for animal welfare and shows whether or not the schemes address these priorities in their standards.

BVA president John Fishwick said: “The infographic is not intended to be a league table but to allow people to understand what aspects of animal health and welfare are addressed by assurance schemes so that they can decide which scheme best aligns with their own individual preferences and priorities."