Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Gene therapy ‘can cure lameness’ - study
The research team believe this gene therapy could offer a much faster healing time.
Research may also have implications for human medicine 

A ‘promising’ gene therapy could offer faster and more effective treatment for lameness in horses, scientists say.

An international team injected DNA into the tendons and ligaments of horses that were lame as a result of injury. Within two to three weeks, the horses were able to walk and trot, and after two months, they were back to full health, galloping and competing.

The results also showed that the tissue within the limbs had fully recovered. Twelve months after treatment, the horses were completely fit, active and pain free.

Scientists used a combination of the vascular endothelial growth factor gene (VEGF164), to enhance blood vessel growth, and the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), which is important for bone and cartilage development.

Both genes were derived from horses and cloned into a single plasmid DNA, which is biologically safe and unlikely to provoke an immune reaction from the body.

The research team believe this gene therapy could offer a much faster healing time, whilst significantly reducing relapse rates. Current medical therapies have a relapse rate of 60 per cent. Even the best regenerative medicine treatments have a 20 per cent relapse rate and take five or six months to work.

Lead author Professor Albert Rizvanov, from Kazan Federal University, said: “Advancing medicine, relieving pain and restoring function were the main aims of this study. We have shown that these are possible and within a much shorter time span than treatments available at the moment.”

In addition, scientists reported that no side effects or adverse reactions were seen in the horses who received treatment.

These findings not only have implications for veterinary medicine, they could also advance treatments for humans. Scientists say this type of therapy could be used in other injuries and situations, ranging from fertility problems to spinal cord injuries.

Dr Catrin Rutland, who led the work at University of Nottingham, said: “This pioneering study advances not only equine medicine but has real implications for how other species and humans are treated for lameness and other disorders in the future. The horses returned to full health after their injuries and did not have any adverse side effects. This is a very exciting medical innovation.”

The next step is to secure funding for a larger trial.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Amur leopard cubs caught on camera

News Story 1
 A pair of Amur leopards have been captured on camera for the first time since their birth. The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland announced the birth in July, but with human presence being kept to a minimum, it was not known how many cubs had been born.

Motion sensitive cameras have now revealed that two cubs emerged from the den - at least one of which may be released into the wild in Russia within the next two or three years. The Amur leopard habitat is not open to the public, to help ensure the cubs retain their wild instincts and behaviour. Image © RZSS 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
New canine and feline dentistry manual announced

A new canine and feline dentistry and oral surgery manual has been published by the BSAVA. Announcing the news on its website, the BSAVA said this latest edition contains new step-by-step operative techniques, together with full-colour illustrations and photographs.

‘This is a timely publication; veterinary dentistry is a field that continues to grow in importance for the general veterinary practitioner,’ the BSAVA said. ‘The manual has been fully revised and updated to include the most relevant, evidence-based techniques.’

The BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Dentistry and Oral Surgery, 4th edition is available to purchase from www.bsava.com/shop