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Scottish SPCA appeal for information after cat poisoning
The most common cause of cat poisoning is antifreeze.
Pet owners urged to be vigilant

A Scottish animal welfare charity is appealing for information after a cat was poisoned in North Lanarkshire.

The Scottish SPCA was alerted by a concerned owner whose cat had been taken ill in Caldercruix, Airdrie. The organisation is now urging owners be on their guard when letting their pets outside.

“We are concerned as the cat owner believes there have been a number of incidents in the area,” commented SPCA inspector Jack Marshall.  “Should this be the case there is likely a source of poison somewhere in the area and we want pet owners to be aware of the potential danger.”

Mr Marshall added that the most common cause of cat poisoning is antifreeze (ethylene glycol). The liquid is usually colourless and odourless, but it has a sweet taste that appeals to dogs in particular but cats will also inject it.

“By the time symptoms occur, such as vomiting, lethargy and, in the latter stages, head shaking and coma, it is normally too late to treat,” Mr Marchall continued. “Pet owners in the area should be vigilant when letting their cats out of the house, and should supervise their animals where possible.”

Anyone with information is being urged to contact the Scottish SPCA animal helpline on 03000 999 999.

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Vets save premature penguin chick

News Story 1
 Vets have saved a tiny Humboldt penguin chick after her egg was accidentally broken by her parents. Keepers at ZSL London Zoo were shocked to find the chick, named Rainbow, still alive and rushed her straight to the Zoo’s on-site veterinary clinic.

It was a little way to go until the chick should have hatched, so the process was touch and go. Vets removed bits of shell from around the chick with tweezers until she could be lifted out and placed in a makeshift nest.

Rainbow is now in a custom-built incubation room where she spends her days cuddled up to a toy penguin. Keepers will hand-fed Rainbow for the next 10 weeks until she is healthy enough to move to the penguin nursery.  

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