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BEVA welcomes new president
During his term as president Dr Pycock hopes to celebrate the positives of working as an equine veterinary professional.
VDS claims consultant inaugurated at congress

Jonathan Pycock of the Veterinary Defence Society (VDS) has been appointed as president of the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA).

Equine claims consultant Dr Pycock will take up his role at the end of BEVA Congress (13-16 September), taking over from Vicki Nicholls. Renate Weller will become president elect.

A graduate of the Royal Veterinary College (RVC),
Dr Pycock has been heavily involved in the BEVA’s clinical practice and ethics and welfare committees since joining the council for the second time in 2014.

During his term as president he hopes to celebrate the positives of working as an equine veterinary professional. He hopes to help members to achieve work/life balance, encouraging active participation in the association, as well as developing relationships between the BEVA and other equine organisations worldwide. He also wants to highlight the shortfall in research on equine reproduction and promote interest in this area.

He commented: “I feel honoured and privileged to have been given the opportunity to be BEVA president. It is a responsibility I do not take lightly. I am well up for doing my best and am 100 per cent ready for the challenging and exciting year ahead.”

Dr Pycock has a PhD in mare gynaecology. After working for private equine practices in the UK and the Southern Hemisphere, he took a job as assistant professor at the University of Utrecht Veterinary School in the Netherlands.

He set up his own equine practice in 1996 before selling the business to colleagues when he took on his current role at the VDS. He also lectures globally on equine reproduction and avoiding litigation in equine practices.

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Vets save premature penguin chick

News Story 1
 Vets have saved a tiny Humboldt penguin chick after her egg was accidentally broken by her parents. Keepers at ZSL London Zoo were shocked to find the chick, named Rainbow, still alive and rushed her straight to the Zoo’s on-site veterinary clinic.

It was a little way to go until the chick should have hatched, so the process was touch and go. Vets removed bits of shell from around the chick with tweezers until she could be lifted out and placed in a makeshift nest.

Rainbow is now in a custom-built incubation room where she spends her days cuddled up to a toy penguin. Keepers will hand-fed Rainbow for the next 10 weeks until she is healthy enough to move to the penguin nursery.  

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BVA president John Fishwick said: “The infographic is not intended to be a league table but to allow people to understand what aspects of animal health and welfare are addressed by assurance schemes so that they can decide which scheme best aligns with their own individual preferences and priorities."