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Dog breeding defects a top concern for vets
French bulldog
Around two-thirds of companion animal vets cited breeding and hereditary defects as a major issue.
Owners urged to talk to their vet about health schemes

Vets are being encouraged to speak to clients about responsible dog breeding and buying as new figures show a huge rise in concern for conformational deformities and pedigree breeding.

According to BVA’s Voice of the Veterinary Profession survey, which polled almost 700 vets across the UK, more than half (52.5%) of all the vets cited breeding and hereditary defects as the most pressing animal health and welfare issue - more than double the proportion expressing concern just two years ago.

The survey also revealed particular concern for vets working in companion animal practice, with around two-thirds (66%) citing breeding and hereditary defects as a major issue.

British Veterinary Association President Gudrun Ravetz said: “With breeding and hereditary defects emerging as the number one animal health and welfare concern for vets, it is more important than ever to screen before breeding dogs. Vets in practice regularly see cases of inherited conditions such as hip dysplasia and eye problems that are debilitating and distressing for dogs.
“The good news is that we have schemes and tests in place that help breeders and owners make sound judgements about responsible breeding. The BVA/KC Canine Health Schemes and Kennel Club DNA testing services are critical tools for breeders. Anyone thinking of breeding from their dog or thinking about buying a puppy should ask their vet about available health schemes and how they can be used to inform their decisions.”

This Puppy Awareness Week (4-10 September), BVA is teaming up with the Animal Welfare Foundation to promote the use of the Puppy Contract, which contains a section for the breeder to fill out about any health screening or DNA results to offer reassurance to owners.

The BVA has also produced a four-minute film on responsible dog breeding and buying that can be placed in practice waiting rooms or on social media channels which also explains the process and benefits of the Canine Health Schemes.

For more information about the BVA/KC Canine Health Schemes visit 

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Campaign highlights ‘devastating impact’ of smoking around pets

News Story 1
 Leading vet charity PDSA has launched a campaign highlighting the ‘devastating impact’ that smoking can have on pets. The launch coincides with National No Smoking Day (14 March 2018) and aims to raise awareness of the risks of passive smoking and how to keep pets safe.

“Recent studies highlight that this is a really serious issue, and we want pet owners to know that they can make a real difference by simply choosing to smoke outdoors away from their pets,” said PDSA vet Olivia Anderson-Nathan. “We want pet owners to realise that, if they smoke, their pets smoke too.”  

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News Shorts
Voting opens for RCVS council elections

Eligible veterinary surgeons can now vote in this year’s RCVS Council elections. Four out of the 10 candidates are already on council and are standing for re-election: David Catlow, Mandisa Greene, Neil Smith, Susan Paterson. The remaining six candidates are not currently on council: John C Davies, Karlien Heyman, John Innes, Thomas Lonsdale, Matthew Plumtree and Iain Richards.

Further information on the candidates can be found on the RCVS website: