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Survey reveals shocking number of cat injuries
The most common cat injuries cited by the respondents were caused by cats falling from a height, airgun injuries and burns.

BVA issues advice to help owners protect their pets

Almost all vets have treated cats for injuries sustained in road traffic accidents (RTAs), falling from a height and walking on hot surfaces, according to new research.

Figures published by the BVA show that a staggering 94 per cent of vets had seen cats injured by RTAs - with one vet treating 99 cases during a 12-month period.

BVA’s Voice of the Veterinary Profession Survey, which sampled some 800 companion animal vets across the UK, revealed that, on average, vets saw twice as many cat RTA injuries as cases of similar dog injuries.

The most common cat injuries cited by the respondents were caused by cats falling from a height, airgun injuries and burns.

"Vets are seeing a shocking number of cat injuries in their surgeries. These statistics should make owners stop and think about whether their homes and gardens are safe enough for their cats,” commented BVA president Gudrun Ravetz.

"Cats are agile and adaptable animals, but their nine lives are a myth. The good news is that cat owners can take some simple steps to protect their pets from the most common accidents and injuries, including using reflective collars, keeping cats indoors overnight, and being careful in the kitchen and with open windows.”

In response to their findings, the BVA has compiled a list of tips to help owners keep their cats as safe as possible. These include:

  • getting a reflective collar, so that cats are visible to car drivers at night
  • keeping cats indoors at night;
  • getting cats neutered so that they roam less and stay closer to home
  • making sure windows above the ground floor are not opened wide enough for cats to fall through
  • keeping cats away from the kitchen during cooking, making sure hobs are cooled and covered before allowing access again.

BVA’s Voice of the Veterinary Profession Survey is a bi-annual survey of veterinary surgeons and veterinary students. The Spring 2016 survey was completed by 1,648 BVA members, 802 of which completed the question on cat and dog injuries. 

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Blue Dog Programme wins WSAVA One Health award

News Story 1
 An educational initiative to help children interact safely with dogs has been awarded the WSAVA’s 2017 Global One Health Award.

The Blue Dog Programme offers an array of educational resources for children, parents and school teachers, including an engaging website, fact sheets, DVD and an accompany book for parents.

The award will be accepted by Professor Tiny de Keuster, a European veterinary specialist in behavioural medicine and founder of the programme, during WSAVA World Congress 2017.  

News Shorts
VMD stakeholder workshops to discuss Brexit implications

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) has announced that it is to hold stakeholder group workshops to discuss the implications of EU exit.

The workshops will be held during Autumn 2017 and will discuss topics such as the prescribing cascade, pharmacovigilance and inspection of non-UK based manufacturers.

To register your interest, send an email to events@vmd.defra.gsi.gov.uk, including any topics, in order of preference, that you would like to be discussed.