Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Survey reveals shocking number of cat injuries
The most common cat injuries cited by the respondents were caused by cats falling from a height, airgun injuries and burns.

BVA issues advice to help owners protect their pets

Almost all vets have treated cats for injuries sustained in road traffic accidents (RTAs), falling from a height and walking on hot surfaces, according to new research.

Figures published by the BVA show that a staggering 94 per cent of vets had seen cats injured by RTAs - with one vet treating 99 cases during a 12-month period.

BVA’s Voice of the Veterinary Profession Survey, which sampled some 800 companion animal vets across the UK, revealed that, on average, vets saw twice as many cat RTA injuries as cases of similar dog injuries.

The most common cat injuries cited by the respondents were caused by cats falling from a height, airgun injuries and burns.

"Vets are seeing a shocking number of cat injuries in their surgeries. These statistics should make owners stop and think about whether their homes and gardens are safe enough for their cats,” commented BVA president Gudrun Ravetz.

"Cats are agile and adaptable animals, but their nine lives are a myth. The good news is that cat owners can take some simple steps to protect their pets from the most common accidents and injuries, including using reflective collars, keeping cats indoors overnight, and being careful in the kitchen and with open windows.”

In response to their findings, the BVA has compiled a list of tips to help owners keep their cats as safe as possible. These include:

  • getting a reflective collar, so that cats are visible to car drivers at night
  • keeping cats indoors at night;
  • getting cats neutered so that they roam less and stay closer to home
  • making sure windows above the ground floor are not opened wide enough for cats to fall through
  • keeping cats away from the kitchen during cooking, making sure hobs are cooled and covered before allowing access again.

BVA’s Voice of the Veterinary Profession Survey is a bi-annual survey of veterinary surgeons and veterinary students. The Spring 2016 survey was completed by 1,648 BVA members, 802 of which completed the question on cat and dog injuries. 

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Vets save premature penguin chick

News Story 1
 Vets have saved a tiny Humboldt penguin chick after her egg was accidentally broken by her parents. Keepers at ZSL London Zoo were shocked to find the chick, named Rainbow, still alive and rushed her straight to the Zoo’s on-site veterinary clinic.

It was a little way to go until the chick should have hatched, so the process was touch and go. Vets removed bits of shell from around the chick with tweezers until she could be lifted out and placed in a makeshift nest.

Rainbow is now in a custom-built incubation room where she spends her days cuddled up to a toy penguin. Keepers will hand-fed Rainbow for the next 10 weeks until she is healthy enough to move to the penguin nursery.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BVA infographic to help shoppers understand farm assurance schemes

An infographic to help members of the public understand farm assurance schemes has been produced by the BVA. The infographic outlines BVA’s priorities for animal welfare and shows whether or not the schemes address these priorities in their standards.

BVA president John Fishwick said: “The infographic is not intended to be a league table but to allow people to understand what aspects of animal health and welfare are addressed by assurance schemes so that they can decide which scheme best aligns with their own individual preferences and priorities."