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Survey reveals shocking number of cat injuries
The most common cat injuries cited by the respondents were caused by cats falling from a height, airgun injuries and burns.

BVA issues advice to help owners protect their pets

Almost all vets have treated cats for injuries sustained in road traffic accidents (RTAs), falling from a height and walking on hot surfaces, according to new research.

Figures published by the BVA show that a staggering 94 per cent of vets had seen cats injured by RTAs - with one vet treating 99 cases during a 12-month period.

BVA’s Voice of the Veterinary Profession Survey, which sampled some 800 companion animal vets across the UK, revealed that, on average, vets saw twice as many cat RTA injuries as cases of similar dog injuries.

The most common cat injuries cited by the respondents were caused by cats falling from a height, airgun injuries and burns.

"Vets are seeing a shocking number of cat injuries in their surgeries. These statistics should make owners stop and think about whether their homes and gardens are safe enough for their cats,” commented BVA president Gudrun Ravetz.

"Cats are agile and adaptable animals, but their nine lives are a myth. The good news is that cat owners can take some simple steps to protect their pets from the most common accidents and injuries, including using reflective collars, keeping cats indoors overnight, and being careful in the kitchen and with open windows.”

In response to their findings, the BVA has compiled a list of tips to help owners keep their cats as safe as possible. These include:

  • getting a reflective collar, so that cats are visible to car drivers at night
  • keeping cats indoors at night;
  • getting cats neutered so that they roam less and stay closer to home
  • making sure windows above the ground floor are not opened wide enough for cats to fall through
  • keeping cats away from the kitchen during cooking, making sure hobs are cooled and covered before allowing access again.

BVA’s Voice of the Veterinary Profession Survey is a bi-annual survey of veterinary surgeons and veterinary students. The Spring 2016 survey was completed by 1,648 BVA members, 802 of which completed the question on cat and dog injuries. 

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Campaign highlights ‘devastating impact’ of smoking around pets

News Story 1
 Leading vet charity PDSA has launched a campaign highlighting the ‘devastating impact’ that smoking can have on pets. The launch coincides with National No Smoking Day (14 March 2018) and aims to raise awareness of the risks of passive smoking and how to keep pets safe.

“Recent studies highlight that this is a really serious issue, and we want pet owners to know that they can make a real difference by simply choosing to smoke outdoors away from their pets,” said PDSA vet Olivia Anderson-Nathan. “We want pet owners to realise that, if they smoke, their pets smoke too.”  

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News Shorts
AWF named charity of the year

The Animal Welfare Foundation (AWF) has been chosen as charity of the year by the Veterinary Marketing Association (VMA). AWF is a vet-led charity, supported by the BVA, which aims to improve animal welfare though research funding, supporting veterinary education, providing pet care advice and encouraging debate on welfare issues.

VMA has pledged a range of support, including raising awareness and funds at their awards ceremony, which takes place on Friday 16 March, as well as offering marketing support through VMA marketing workshops.