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BVA issues advice after celebrity saves dog with CPR
The veterinary profession has been working hard to highlight the significant health problems suffered by brachycephalic dogs and cats.

Jodie Marsh video viewed over four million times

A video showing Jodie Marsh resuscitating her dog has gone viral, prompting the BVA to issue advice to pet owners on CPR.

The video has been viewed some four million times and shows the celebrity giving her bulldog CPR after he collapsed.

On her Facebook page, Ms Marsh explains that her 12-year-old rescue dog collapses every couple of months.

She also highlights the hazards of taking brachycephalic dogs for a walk in hot weather and the choking hazards that eating can present for dogs with an abnormal soft palate.

“This is a very distressing video that demonstrates just how serious BOAS (brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome) is as a condition for those dogs living with it,” commented BVA president, Gudrun Ravetz.
 
“No dog should have to endure the distress of regularly collapsing, though sadly this is a reality for many flat-faced dogs. We would strongly advise anyone with a pet suffering these symptoms to talk to their vet urgently to agree the best way to ensure the health and welfare of their pet.”

Over the past year, the veterinary profession has been working hard to highlight the significant health problems suffered by brachycephalic dogs and cats. At the same time, the industry has seen a rise in the popularity of such breeds, mostly due to their high media profile and celebrity ownership.

Commenting on the use of CPR in dogs, Ms Ravetz said that, in emergencies, an owner can give CPR until veterinary care is available.

“This mouth-to-nose resuscitation should only be used if the dog has stopped breathing and has no pulse,” she said. "We would advise owners to take veterinary advice, or attend a veterinary-led course, to learn how to deliver CPR in the safest way.”

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Scheme to protect wildlife and reduce flooding

News Story 1
 Natural England has announced a new scheme to improve flood protection, boost wildlife and create 160 hectares of new saltmarsh. The £6 million scheme in Lancashire will effectively unite the RSPB’s Hesketh Out Marsh Reserve and Natural England’s Ribble Estuary National Nature Reserve. The completed reserve will be the largest site of its kind in the north of England. 

News Shorts
Welfare event to discuss ethical dilemmas faced by vets

Students and ethics experts will host an event on the difficult moral challenges facing vets. Ethical issues, such as euthanasia and breeding animals for certain physical traits, will be discussed by prominent speakers including TV vet Emma Milne and RSPCA chief vet James Yeates. Other topics will include how to tackle suspected animal abuse and the extent of surgical intervention.

The conference will look at how these dilemmas affect the wellbeing of vets, and explore how to better prepare veterinary students for work. It will be held at the University of Edinburgh’s Easter Bush Campus from 30 September - 1 October 2017. Tickets can be purchased here.