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BVA issues advice after celebrity saves dog with CPR
The veterinary profession has been working hard to highlight the significant health problems suffered by brachycephalic dogs and cats.

Jodie Marsh video viewed over four million times

A video showing Jodie Marsh resuscitating her dog has gone viral, prompting the BVA to issue advice to pet owners on CPR.

The video has been viewed some four million times and shows the celebrity giving her bulldog CPR after he collapsed.

On her Facebook page, Ms Marsh explains that her 12-year-old rescue dog collapses every couple of months.

She also highlights the hazards of taking brachycephalic dogs for a walk in hot weather and the choking hazards that eating can present for dogs with an abnormal soft palate.

“This is a very distressing video that demonstrates just how serious BOAS (brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome) is as a condition for those dogs living with it,” commented BVA president, Gudrun Ravetz.
 
“No dog should have to endure the distress of regularly collapsing, though sadly this is a reality for many flat-faced dogs. We would strongly advise anyone with a pet suffering these symptoms to talk to their vet urgently to agree the best way to ensure the health and welfare of their pet.”

Over the past year, the veterinary profession has been working hard to highlight the significant health problems suffered by brachycephalic dogs and cats. At the same time, the industry has seen a rise in the popularity of such breeds, mostly due to their high media profile and celebrity ownership.

Commenting on the use of CPR in dogs, Ms Ravetz said that, in emergencies, an owner can give CPR until veterinary care is available.

“This mouth-to-nose resuscitation should only be used if the dog has stopped breathing and has no pulse,” she said. "We would advise owners to take veterinary advice, or attend a veterinary-led course, to learn how to deliver CPR in the safest way.”

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Classroom pets on the decline

News Story 1
 New research has found there are fewer pets in UK classrooms than in previous generations - despite 88 per cent of parents believing it significantly helps a child’s social skills and development.

More than half of the parents surveyed by Pets at Home (51 per cent) had a class pet as a child, compared to 46 per cent of children today.

The survey also found that non-traditional animals such as chickens, tadpoles, caterpillars and stick insects are becoming increasingly popular alternatives as classroom pets.  

News Shorts
BVA survey seeks views on surveillance

Vets who use veterinary scanning surveillance networks are being asked to complete a survey to help ensure the networks are fully able to protect animals in the UK.

‘Surveillance use, understanding and engagement across the veterinary profession’ is the first of a series of surveillance surveys that will also include localised surveys for Northern Ireland and Scotland.

Drafted by members of BVA’s Surveillance Working Group, it will run until Friday, 31 August 2017. Data collected will inform BVA’s policy position ensuring it is representative of disease surveillance across the UK.