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BVA issues advice after celebrity saves dog with CPR
The veterinary profession has been working hard to highlight the significant health problems suffered by brachycephalic dogs and cats.

Jodie Marsh video viewed over four million times

A video showing Jodie Marsh resuscitating her dog has gone viral, prompting the BVA to issue advice to pet owners on CPR.

The video has been viewed some four million times and shows the celebrity giving her bulldog CPR after he collapsed.

On her Facebook page, Ms Marsh explains that her 12-year-old rescue dog collapses every couple of months.

She also highlights the hazards of taking brachycephalic dogs for a walk in hot weather and the choking hazards that eating can present for dogs with an abnormal soft palate.

“This is a very distressing video that demonstrates just how serious BOAS (brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome) is as a condition for those dogs living with it,” commented BVA president, Gudrun Ravetz.
“No dog should have to endure the distress of regularly collapsing, though sadly this is a reality for many flat-faced dogs. We would strongly advise anyone with a pet suffering these symptoms to talk to their vet urgently to agree the best way to ensure the health and welfare of their pet.”

Over the past year, the veterinary profession has been working hard to highlight the significant health problems suffered by brachycephalic dogs and cats. At the same time, the industry has seen a rise in the popularity of such breeds, mostly due to their high media profile and celebrity ownership.

Commenting on the use of CPR in dogs, Ms Ravetz said that, in emergencies, an owner can give CPR until veterinary care is available.

“This mouth-to-nose resuscitation should only be used if the dog has stopped breathing and has no pulse,” she said. "We would advise owners to take veterinary advice, or attend a veterinary-led course, to learn how to deliver CPR in the safest way.”

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Campaign highlights ‘devastating impact’ of smoking around pets

News Story 1
 Leading vet charity PDSA has launched a campaign highlighting the ‘devastating impact’ that smoking can have on pets. The launch coincides with National No Smoking Day (14 March 2018) and aims to raise awareness of the risks of passive smoking and how to keep pets safe.

“Recent studies highlight that this is a really serious issue, and we want pet owners to know that they can make a real difference by simply choosing to smoke outdoors away from their pets,” said PDSA vet Olivia Anderson-Nathan. “We want pet owners to realise that, if they smoke, their pets smoke too.”  

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News Shorts
AWF named charity of the year

The Animal Welfare Foundation (AWF) has been chosen as charity of the year by the Veterinary Marketing Association (VMA). AWF is a vet-led charity, supported by the BVA, which aims to improve animal welfare though research funding, supporting veterinary education, providing pet care advice and encouraging debate on welfare issues.

VMA has pledged a range of support, including raising awareness and funds at their awards ceremony, which takes place on Friday 16 March, as well as offering marketing support through VMA marketing workshops.