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Study shows neonicotinoids can harm bees
Researchers exposed bees to winter-sown oilseed rape that had been treated with two different neonicotinoids.
Researchers assess effect of the pesticides across Europe

The largest study so far on neonicotinoid pesticides has concluded that they do cause harm to some species of bee.

Published in Science, the study found that neonicotinoids reduce the capacity of honeybees and wild bees to establish new populations in the year following exposure.

The effects of the pesticides were assessed across Hungary, Germany and the United Kingdom.

Speaking to BBC News, study author Professor Richard Pywell stated that the findings are cause for serious concern.

"We've shown for the first time negative effects of neonicotinoid-coated seed dressings on honeybees and we've also shown similar negative effects on wild bees,” he said.

"This is important because many crops globally are insect pollinated and without pollinators, we would struggle to produce some foods."

In the study, researchers exposed bees to winter-sown oilseed rape that had been treated with two different neonicotinoids - clothianidin and thiamethoxam - in addition to untreated oilseed rape.

For honeybees, the researchers found both negative and positive effects during crop flowering. In Hungary, negative effects on honey bees persisted over winter and resulted in smaller colonies the following spring. In wild bees, reproduction was negatively correlated with neonicotinoid residues.

Neonicotinoid producer Bayer, which part-funded the study, said in a press release that the findings were ‘inclusive’ and that it remained convinced that neonicotinoids have no short or long-term negative effect on bees.

Dr Richard Schmuck, director of environmental science at Bayer said: “We do not share the CEH’s interpretation that adverse effects of the seed treatments can be concluded from this study, and remain confident that neonicotinoids are safe when used and applied responsibly.”

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Scheme to protect wildlife and reduce flooding

News Story 1
 Natural England has announced a new scheme to improve flood protection, boost wildlife and create 160 hectares of new saltmarsh. The £6 million scheme in Lancashire will effectively unite the RSPB’s Hesketh Out Marsh Reserve and Natural England’s Ribble Estuary National Nature Reserve. The completed reserve will be the largest site of its kind in the north of England. 

News Shorts
Welfare event to discuss ethical dilemmas faced by vets

Students and ethics experts will host an event on the difficult moral challenges facing vets. Ethical issues, such as euthanasia and breeding animals for certain physical traits, will be discussed by prominent speakers including TV vet Emma Milne and RSPCA chief vet James Yeates. Other topics will include how to tackle suspected animal abuse and the extent of surgical intervention.

The conference will look at how these dilemmas affect the wellbeing of vets, and explore how to better prepare veterinary students for work. It will be held at the University of Edinburgh’s Easter Bush Campus from 30 September - 1 October 2017. Tickets can be purchased here.