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Innovation award for animal welfare courses
The on-campus Masters in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare was introduced by Professor David Wood-Gush, one of the first scientists to investigate the effects of large-scale farming on animals.
Edinburgh courses recognised for role in transforming animal care
 
Two animal welfare courses have been recognised for the role they have played in transforming the care of pets, livestock and wild animals worldwide for more than a quarter of a century.

The on-campus and online programmes at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies received the Innovative Developments in Animal Welfare Award from the British Society of Animal Science and the RSPCA.

Over 600 students have completed the on-campus Masters in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare, which was introduced in 1990 by Professor David Wood-Gush, who was one of the first scientists to investigate the effects of large-scale farming on animals. It is led jointly by the University of Edinburgh and the SRUC.

According to the university, alumni have gone on to make significant achievements in animal welfare globally, forging careers in research, education, government, veterinary practice and within non-governmental or industry organisations.

The online Masters in International Animal Welfare Ethics and Law was launched in 2012 and graduates have already made notable impacts in legislation and policy changes.

Professor David Argyle, head of the Royal (Dick) Vet School said: “We are committed to training the animal welfare leaders of the future and are thrilled that these programmes, run jointly with SRUC, have been recognised for their success.”

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Classroom pets on the decline

News Story 1
 New research has found there are fewer pets in UK classrooms than in previous generations - despite 88 per cent of parents believing it significantly helps a child’s social skills and development.

More than half of the parents surveyed by Pets at Home (51 per cent) had a class pet as a child, compared to 46 per cent of children today.

The survey also found that non-traditional animals such as chickens, tadpoles, caterpillars and stick insects are becoming increasingly popular alternatives as classroom pets.  

News Shorts
BVA survey seeks views on surveillance

Vets who use veterinary scanning surveillance networks are being asked to complete a survey to help ensure the networks are fully able to protect animals in the UK.

‘Surveillance use, understanding and engagement across the veterinary profession’ is the first of a series of surveillance surveys that will also include localised surveys for Northern Ireland and Scotland.

Drafted by members of BVA’s Surveillance Working Group, it will run until Friday, 31 August 2017. Data collected will inform BVA’s policy position ensuring it is representative of disease surveillance across the UK.