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Raccoon dogs ‘becoming more popular as pets’
raccoon dog
RSPCA staff have renamed the raccoon dog Cedric.

RSPCA issues warning after stray pet found

The RSPCA is urging people not to buy pet raccoon dogs following a recent call-out to a stray, which was found by a member of the public.

In recent years the charity has dealt with a number of call-outs to stray pet raccoon dogs that have either escaped or been deliberately released into the wild.

The exotic mammal, also known as a tanuki, was discovered hiding under a water tank in a garden in Kirton Holme, near Boston.

Inspector Becky Harper said: “While he is very cute, we’d like to stress that raccoon dogs don’t make good pets. They are wild animals and, while they sadly seem to be becoming more popular as pets in the UK, we would strongly discourage people from buying or keeping one as a pet.

“They need a great deal of space and their needs cannot be met in a typical domestic environment. If they escape or are released into the wild they are a high invasive non-native species risk to our native wildlife.”

Releasing a non-native species into the wild, or allowing it to escape, is an offence under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

RSPCA staff have renamed the raccoon dog Cedric. Despite attempts to trace his owner, nobody has come forward to claim him so he will be rehomed to a specialist keeper.

Image courtesy of the RSPCA

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Scheme to protect wildlife and reduce flooding

News Story 1
 Natural England has announced a new scheme to improve flood protection, boost wildlife and create 160 hectares of new saltmarsh. The Ł6 million scheme in Lancashire will effectively unite the RSPB’s Hesketh Out Marsh Reserve and Natural England’s Ribble Estuary National Nature Reserve. The completed reserve will be the largest site of its kind in the north of England. 

News Shorts
Welfare event to discuss ethical dilemmas faced by vets

Students and ethics experts will host an event on the difficult moral challenges facing vets. Ethical issues, such as euthanasia and breeding animals for certain physical traits, will be discussed by prominent speakers including TV vet Emma Milne and RSPCA chief vet James Yeates. Other topics will include how to tackle suspected animal abuse and the extent of surgical intervention.

The conference will look at how these dilemmas affect the wellbeing of vets, and explore how to better prepare veterinary students for work. It will be held at the University of Edinburgh’s Easter Bush Campus from 30 September - 1 October 2017. Tickets can be purchased here.