Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

"Ladies and gentlemen we can rebuild him"
Professor John Innes.
The impact of science and technology on orthopaedics

In a lively and highly informative presentation at the BSAVA Congress in Birmingham today, Professor John Innes, who is UK referral director for the CVS Chestergates practice, dealt with the subject of the future of veterinary orthopaedics in the light of technological advances.

In an oblique reference to Channel 4's Super Vet programme, John said: "We are all 'supervets'". He pointed out to his audience that it is comparatively easy to keep up to date if you are an expert in an "ivory tower" studying a fairly narrow subject. But vets in practice have to be mindful of techniques and developments across all fields of veterinary medicine and surgery, which is no mean feat.

Although the dramatic activities of 'bionic vet', Noel Fitzpatrick may make "good TV", they have a relatively low impact because they involve time-consuming and costly procedures that can, as a consequence, only be applied to a small number of patients. Much greater impacts can be achieved by utilising other technologies and developments.

He emphasised the potential being offered in orthopaedics by the unravelling of the canine genome. There are already tests available that help predict susceptibility to hip dysplasia and genomics is an area of exponential development whereby inappropriate breeding can be avoided.

There are Apps available on smartphones which slow down videos of movement and gait in order to permit better diagnosis of lameness in dogs. There are also programs that operate 3-directional accelerometry and GPS can be used to track the extent of dogs' voluntary exercise.

Stereolithography is an advancing science; and CT scanning, in conjunction with 3-D printing, helps in the remodelling of deformed and injured bones. Selective laser melting can be used to build up a porous structure in titanium around which new bone can form. This porosity also facilitates the infiltration of blood vessels to provide nutrition for the developing bone.

About 1 in 5 dogs in the UK have osteoarthritis. Although non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) provide a degree of analgesia, there are unwanted side effects and so-called 'breakthroughs' in the pain relief achieved. John described EP4 prostaglandin inhibitors and nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibitors, which are two agents "on the horizon" that will help to block pain via different pathways. The latter may well represent a paradigm shift in the management of pain in cats.

Long-acting local anaesthetics are now available and will soon be available to the UK veterinary profession.

John ended his session with a cautionary note. "Not all technology is going to be better, so we need to be careful and make progress in incremental steps", he said.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Giraffe Conservation Foundation named BVNA’s charity of the year

News Story 1
 BVNA president Wendy Nevins has named The Giraffe Conservation Foundation as the association’s charity of the year for 2017/2018.

The Giraffe Conservation Foundation dedicates its work to a sustainable future for wild giraffe populations. Wendy Nevins said: ‘I have chosen the Giraffe Conservation Foundation for the BVNA Charity of the Year because I have always thought Giraffes were magnificent animals.

‘I also think it is important that we look at the wider issue of conservation and education across all species.’  

News Shorts
Scientists win award for openness in animal research

UK scientists have won an award for the 360ş Laboratory Animal Tours project, which offered the public an online, interactive tour of four research facilities that are usually restricted access.

The project won a public engagement award at the Understanding Animal Research (UAR) Openness Awards, which recognise UK research facilities for transparency on their use of animals in research, as well as innovation in communicating with the public.

The tour was created by the Pirbright Institute, the University of Oxford, the University of Bristol and MRC Harwell Institute.