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Novel vaccine protects against RSV
The vaccine was used to immunise five calves aged three-to-six weeks, via two injections four weeks apart. (stock photo)
Success with cattle offers hope for human vaccine
A novel vaccine has shown success in protecting cattle from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, and could offer hope for a human vaccine, researchers say.

RSV causes the majority of respiratory disease in cattle and is responsible for substantial economic loss. In humans, it causes serious bronchiolitis and pneumonia in young children, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems. There are estimated to be more than 250,000 human deaths a year as a result of RSV infection.

Currently there is no licensed vaccine for humans and cattle vaccines have noted issues with safety and effectiveness.

Research on the novel vaccine was conducted by a team of experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) in the US, the Pirbright Institute in the UK and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine in Switzerland.

The vaccine was used to immunise five calves aged three-to-six weeks, via two injections four weeks apart. It contains a single, structurally engineered RSV protein, which is a stabilised version of the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein it its initial conformation, pre-F. Other vaccines have used the same protein in its final conformation, post-F, but scientists say the immune response is much lower.

A second group of five calves were injected with a post-F protein, while the third group received two placebo injections of saline.

Four weeks later, calves in all three groups were infected with RSV. Of those injected with pre-F, four out of five were protected from RSV viral replication in the upper and lower respiratory tract and calves had high levels of neutralising antibodies - more than 100 fold higher than those given the post-F vaccine. However, RSV was detected in all calves given the post-F vaccine or the placebo.

Researchers say their findings, which were published in npj Vaccines, support further work on pre-F vaccines to protect humans and cattle from RSV. NIAID recently started testing a similar vaccine in a phase one human trial.

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Charity reveals it treated thousands of pets with dental issues last year

News Story 1
 Battersea Dogs & Cats Home has revealed that its veterinary team performs dental procedures on more than 170 animals every month. Last year the charity says it extracted hundreds of teeth from more than 800 animals and carried out thousands of routine scales and polishes.

To combat the problem, Battersea is urging pet owners to get regular dental checks at their vets, implement a daily oral care routine, feed a good dental chew and only give toys that are designed for dogs, including gentle rubber toys that are less wearing on the teeth. 

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Voting opens for RCVS council elections

Eligible veterinary surgeons can now vote in this year’s RCVS Council elections. Four out of the 10 candidates are already on council and are standing for re-election: David Catlow, Mandisa Greene, Neil Smith, Susan Paterson. The remaining six candidates are not currently on council: John C Davies, Karlien Heyman, John Innes, Thomas Lonsdale, Matthew Plumtree and Iain Richards.

Further information on the candidates can be found on the RCVS website: