Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Early warning signs of Huntingdon’s found in sheep
sheep
Blood samples revealed ‘startling differences’ in the biochemistry of sheep carrying the HD gene.

Research uncovers biomarkers for illness before symptoms begin
 
Scientists say they have identified early warning signs of Huntingdon’s disease in sheep carrying the human HD mutation, suggesting the illness affects the body long before physical symptoms appear.

The research, carried out by the Universities of Surrey and Cambridge and published in Scientific Reports, could offer new insights into this devastating illness in humans.

Huntingdon’s disease is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 6,700 people in the UK. There is no cure, and patients typically die 10-25 years after diagnosis.

Researchers found metabolic changes in five-year-old sheep carrying the HD gene. Up until this point, the animals had shown no signs of the illness.

Blood samples revealed ‘startling differences’ in the biochemistry of sheep carrying the HD gene, compared to normal sheep. There were significant changes in 89 out of 130 metabolites measured in the blood, with increased levels of amino acids, arginine and citrulline, and decreased levels of sphingolipids and fatty acids that are commonly found in brain and nervous tissue.

Researchers say the alterations in metabolites suggests that the urea cycle and nitric oxide pathways, which are both vital body processes, are dysregulated in the early stages of Huntingdon’s disease. The identification of these biomarkers could help to track the disease in pre-symptomatic patients, and could help researchers to come up with strategies to address the biochemical abnormalities.

Professor Jenny Morton from the University of Cambridge said: “Despite its devastating impacts on patients and their families, there are currently limited treatments options, and no cure for Huntington’s disease. The development of objective and reliable biomarkers that can be rapidly measured from blood samples becomes immeasurably important once clinical trials for therapies begin.

“The more we learn about this devastating illness the better chance we have of finding a cure.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

HM The Queen opens new centre for elephant care

News Story 1
 HM The Queen, accompanied by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, has officially unveiled ZSL Whipsnade Zoo’s brand new Centre for Elephant Care.

Set amidst 30 acres of rolling paddocks, the custom-designed Centre for Elephant Care is the new home for the Zoo’s herd of nine Asian elephants.

The Centre will provide more than 700m˛ of indoor space and contains an array of elephant-friendly features, including dimming lights to mimic night-time and one metre-deep soft sand flooring.  

News Shorts
New manual to help producers use medicines responsibly

A new manual to help sheep and beef producers use medicines responsibly has been published by AHDB Beef & Lamb.

The Better Returns Programme manual, Using Medicines Correctly for Better Returns, outlines the key principles when using medicines on the farm.

It includes making sure the medicine and correct dose is used at the right time, and that it is stored and administered correctly. It also explains the importance of using antibiotics and anthelmintics responsibly to avoid the build up of resistance.