Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Early warning signs of Huntingdon’s found in sheep
sheep
Blood samples revealed ‘startling differences’ in the biochemistry of sheep carrying the HD gene.

Research uncovers biomarkers for illness before symptoms begin
 
Scientists say they have identified early warning signs of Huntingdon’s disease in sheep carrying the human HD mutation, suggesting the illness affects the body long before physical symptoms appear.

The research, carried out by the Universities of Surrey and Cambridge and published in Scientific Reports, could offer new insights into this devastating illness in humans.

Huntingdon’s disease is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 6,700 people in the UK. There is no cure, and patients typically die 10-25 years after diagnosis.

Researchers found metabolic changes in five-year-old sheep carrying the HD gene. Up until this point, the animals had shown no signs of the illness.

Blood samples revealed ‘startling differences’ in the biochemistry of sheep carrying the HD gene, compared to normal sheep. There were significant changes in 89 out of 130 metabolites measured in the blood, with increased levels of amino acids, arginine and citrulline, and decreased levels of sphingolipids and fatty acids that are commonly found in brain and nervous tissue.

Researchers say the alterations in metabolites suggests that the urea cycle and nitric oxide pathways, which are both vital body processes, are dysregulated in the early stages of Huntingdon’s disease. The identification of these biomarkers could help to track the disease in pre-symptomatic patients, and could help researchers to come up with strategies to address the biochemical abnormalities.

Professor Jenny Morton from the University of Cambridge said: “Despite its devastating impacts on patients and their families, there are currently limited treatments options, and no cure for Huntington’s disease. The development of objective and reliable biomarkers that can be rapidly measured from blood samples becomes immeasurably important once clinical trials for therapies begin.

“The more we learn about this devastating illness the better chance we have of finding a cure.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Blue Dog Programme wins WSAVA One Health award

News Story 1
 An educational initiative to help children interact safely with dogs has been awarded the WSAVA’s 2017 Global One Health Award.

The Blue Dog Programme offers an array of educational resources for children, parents and school teachers, including an engaging website, fact sheets, DVD and an accompany book for parents.

The award will be accepted by Professor Tiny de Keuster, a European veterinary specialist in behavioural medicine and founder of the programme, during WSAVA World Congress 2017.  

News Shorts
VMD stakeholder workshops to discuss Brexit implications

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) has announced that it is to hold stakeholder group workshops to discuss the implications of EU exit.

The workshops will be held during Autumn 2017 and will discuss topics such as the prescribing cascade, pharmacovigilance and inspection of non-UK based manufacturers.

To register your interest, send an email to events@vmd.defra.gsi.gov.uk, including any topics, in order of preference, that you would like to be discussed.