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‘Outstanding scientist’ made Roslin Institute director
Prof Eleanor Riley
Prof Riley will take up her new post later this year.
Professor Eleanor Riley succeeds David Hume
 
The Roslin Institute has appointed Professor Eleanor Riley as its new director, after Professor Hume stepped down in January.

Prof Riley is currently professor of infectious disease immunology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She will take up her new post later this year.

Commenting on her appointment, Prof Sir John Savill, head of the University of Edinburgh’s College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, said: “Professor Riley is an outstanding, internationally respected scientist. She brings an impressive track record in leading major multi-partner projects in the UK and abroad.

“We are confident that her visionary leadership will cement the Roslin Institute as a global research leader in human and animal health.”

Prof Riley has a background in veterinary medicine, human infectious diseases and global health, and can boast more than 30 years’ of experience of research in the UK and Africa.

She graduated from the University of Bristol with degrees in Cellular Pathology and Veterinary Science. Following that she trained in Veterinary Pathology at Cornell University and completed a PhD in Immunology and Parasitology from the University of Liverpool.

After five years working with the Medical Research Council Laboratories in The Gambia, she joined the University of Edinburgh’s Division of Biological Sciences as a Wellcome Trust senior research fellow in 1990.

She became a professor of infectious disease immunology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 1998, and led the school’s department of immunology and infection from 2001 to 2013.

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Sale of microbeads now banned

News Story 1
 The sale of products containing microbeads is now banned across England and Scotland, Defra has confirmed.

As part of government efforts to prevent these plastics ending up in the marine environment, retailers can no longer sell rinse-off cosmetics and personal care products containing microbeads. These tiny plastics were often added to products including face scrubs, soaps, toothpaste and shower gels.

Just a single shower is thought to send 100,000 of these beads down the drain and into the ocean, where it can cause serious harm to marine life. A ban on manufacturing products containing microbeads previously came into force in January this year. 

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News Shorts
George Eustice announces funding for Bovine Viral Diarrhoea

Farming minister George Eustice has announced a £5.7million funding package to help farmers tackle Bovine Viral Diarrhoea (BVD).

The funding will be available in England for three years through the Rural Development Programme and farmers will be able to apply for one-to-one farm advisory visits by a veterinary practitioner.

The project will recruit local vets who will then work with keepers of breeding cattle to tackle BVD on their farms.