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Immune cell study prompts new approach to tackling infections
Oxygen levels in the body can have a profound effect on the way cells behave.

Oxygen level affects how cells behave

A new study by the University of Edinburgh has found that oxygen levels in the body can have a profound effect on the way cells behave.

The research, published in the journal Science Immunology, could pave the way to new treatments that target the immune response to infection.

In the study of mice, researchers found that bacteria infections have vastly different outcomes depending on the level of oxygen in the body when infection takes hold.  

In mice that had low levels of oxygen in the body when the virus took hold, the immune system launched a massive overreaction. Fatal illness occurred, even though the bacteria had cleared from the body.

If the mice had low oxygen levels before the virus took hold, the researchers found that this protects the body from illness, without preventing it from fighting the bacteria.

If human cells react in the same way, researchers say that oxygen sensing mechanisms could be ‘tweaked’ in order to tackle infections.

It is hoped that the findings will help people suffering from chronic lung conditions, such as emphysema. These patients often have low levels of oxygen in their body and are more susceptible to infection.

“We are excited by our observation that oxygen levels can regulate immune cell responses to infection,” commented Dr Sarah Walmsley, of the MRC Centre for Inflammation Research at the University of Edinburgh.

“Targeting these pathways could have the potential to improve outcomes from infections where oxygen is limited.”

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Blue Dog Programme wins WSAVA One Health award

News Story 1
 An educational initiative to help children interact safely with dogs has been awarded the WSAVA’s 2017 Global One Health Award.

The Blue Dog Programme offers an array of educational resources for children, parents and school teachers, including an engaging website, fact sheets, DVD and an accompany book for parents.

The award will be accepted by Professor Tiny de Keuster, a European veterinary specialist in behavioural medicine and founder of the programme, during WSAVA World Congress 2017.  

News Shorts
VMD stakeholder workshops to discuss Brexit implications

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) has announced that it is to hold stakeholder group workshops to discuss the implications of EU exit.

The workshops will be held during Autumn 2017 and will discuss topics such as the prescribing cascade, pharmacovigilance and inspection of non-UK based manufacturers.

To register your interest, send an email to events@vmd.defra.gsi.gov.uk, including any topics, in order of preference, that you would like to be discussed.