Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Soi Dog co-founder Gill Dalley dies following short battle with cancer
"The stray dogs and cats of the region have lost one of their greatest champions."

Charity pays tribute to champion of animal welfare

The veterinary profession is saddened to learn of the passing of Soi Dog co-founder Gill Dalley, who lost her short battle with cancer at the age of 58.

Having retired with husband John to Phuket in 2003, the couple were determined to do something about the horrendous stray dog and cat problem they had witnessed on previous holidays. They met a Dutch ex-pat called Margot who had also just retired to the same island and was of a similar mindset. It was then that the Soi Dog Foundation was born.

It was the charity’s vision to humanely reduce the stray population through a programme of mass sterilisation, to provide medical treatment for the sick and injured, to give shelter and secure adoptions, and to educate young people on animal welfare issues.

Less than one year after the charity launched, Gill, who had been weakened by a broken rib, darted a dog which ran into a flooded former rice paddy. In retrieving the dog, Gill became infected with a rare soil-borne bacteria. She developed septicaemia a few days later and was given a 10 per cent chance of survival. Surpassing all expectations, she survived the illness but did lose both of her lower legs and suffered damage to her arms.

In December 2014, just three days after Gill was discharged from hospital, the Asian Tsunami struck, killing her best friend and Soi Dog volunteer Leone Cosens. Bound to her wheelchair, Gill showed enormous strength by counselling survivors and relatives of victims before commencing to work at mobile clinics.

Through sheer determination, Gill taught herself to walk again and for the past 12 years refused to use her wheelchair - despite her stumps often being covered with blisters. Through ill-health Margot was forced to take early retirement and Gill became the driving force of the Soi Dog Foundation, including the establishment of its first shelter.

Today Soi Dog Foundation is the largest foundation in Asia working with stray dogs and cats. Currently employing nearly 200 staff, registered in seven countries and aiming to achieve 100,000 sterilisations per year - and end the cruel Asian dog meat industry - it is expanding its operations to other countries in the region as well as throughout Thailand.


In a statement, the charity said: “Without Gill and her determination to carry on and beat the odds, Soi Dog Foundation simply would not exist today, and the stray dogs and cats of the region have lost one of their greatest champions. Sadly, despite fighting bravely for the past few weeks she faced a battle that even she could not overcome.”

Gill leaves husband John to continue their work and her family of rescued dogs and cats.

Image (C) Soi Dog Foundation.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Practices urged to support #vets4vultures

News Story 1
 Veterinary professionals are being urged to take part in the #vets4vultures online fundraising campaign. Vultures are persecuted throughout the world and numbers of some species have fallen by 99.9 per cent in recent years. Wildlife Vets International rescue and rehabilitate the birds of prey, as well as training local vets. However, the charity needs to raise £18,000 for its conservation plans to go ahead next year.

It has been selected for The Big Christmas Give Challenge, which goes live on 28 November. To help practices encourage clients to get involved, there is an online promotional pack containing resources for websites and social media platforms.

For more information emailinfo@wildlifevetsinternational  

News Shorts
Avian flu text alert service launched in Northern Ireland

A new text system to alert bird keepers to the threat of avian flu has been launched in Northern Ireland. The service will enable bird keepers to take action to protect their flock at the earliest opportunity.

Keepers who have already provided NI's Department of Agriculture with a valid mobile number have automatically been subscribed to the service and notified by text. Bird keepers who have not yet received a text should text ‘BIRDS’ to 67300 to register.