Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

French bulldog set to become ‘most popular breed’
frenchie
New figures show there were 21,854 French bulldog registrations in 2016.
Registration figures prompt ‘welfare crisis’ concern
 
French bulldogs could soon overtake Labradors as the UK’s most popular dog breed, according to the latest Kennel Club registration figures.

Popular with celebrities including the Beckhams and Leonardo DiCaprio, French bulldogs are currently in third place, after Labrador retrievers and cocker spaniels. If current trends continue, the breed is on course to take the top spot by the end of 2018, unseating Labradors for the first time in 27 years.

New figures show that in 2016 the Kennel Club registered 21,470 French bulldog puppies, 33,856 Labradors and 21,854 cocker spaniels. This represents a 47 per cent increase in the number of Frenchie registrations from 2015-2016 alone, and a staggering 3,104 per cent increase in the past 10 years.

However, the Kennel Club figures account for just 30 per cent of the UK’s total dog population, meaning the number of French bulldogs in the country is likely to be far higher, including dogs that have been imported illegally from Eastern Europe.

There are concerns that the breed’s popularity is rising as a result of celebrity fashions rather than its suitability for owners. Animal welfare charities are already seeing an increase in Frenchies coming through their doors.

“French bulldog welfare services are getting more and more dogs through their doors, so there is a genuine concern that we could be facing a welfare crisis if their numbers keep increasing,” commented Jackie Mavro-Michaelis, secretary of the Pennine and Scottish French Bulldog Association.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club secretary, added: “The breed is a favourite with celebrities, who often flaunt them on their Instagram and Twitter accounts for people to coo over. While it’s normal to want to show off your dog, when celebrities do it, it usually results in a surge in the popularity of certain breeds, which is not a good thing as it opens the doors to unscrupulous breeders who see it as an opportunity to breed lots of them without due care to health and welfare.”

Would-be dog owners are being urged to do their research and consider other breeds that may be more suited to their lifestyles. For those intent on buying a French bulldog, choosing a responsible breeder or considering a rescue dog is crucial if they are to avoid contributing to an impending welfare crisis.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Working animals abroad to benefit from charity tea party

News Story 1
 Dog owners are being urged to put their baking skills to good use to raise funds for sick and injured animals working abroad.

The SPANA World Tea Party takes place on Saturday 8 July. As well as the exclusive dog-friendly ‘Pupcakes’, SPANA’s fundraising pack also includes recipe ideas and tips for humans to host their own traditional British afternoon tea party.

Money raised from the event will provide free veterinary treatment to working animals in developing countries.  

News Shorts
Bojan Zorko honoured for contribution to veterinary medicine in Slovenia

Professor Bojan Zorko has been chosen for WSAVA’s Meritorious Service Award, in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the development of veterinary medicine in Slovenia.

Prof Zorko is a specialist in canine and feline medicine, a professor of veterinary radiology at the University of Ljubljana and a director of the International Veterinary Radiology Association for Central and Eastern Europe. WSAVA president Walt Ingwersen praised his long-standing service to voluntary organisations and his commitment to teaching and research.