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BEVA publishes new safety guidance for equine vets
WW1 US army veterinary surgeons prepare for surgery.

Booklet outlines how to make ‘on the spot’ risk assessments

New guidelines to help veterinary practitioners stay safe around equines have been published by the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA).

The nine-page booklet is available to download at beva.org.uk/workplacesafety together with a practical, illustrated leaflet on spotting some of the warning signs a horse might display.

The guidelines follow the publication of a BEVA report, which revealed that vets can expect to sustain seven to eight work-related injuries over the course of a 30-year-working life.

Furthermore, figures released by the Health & Safety Executive show that vets sustain a remarkably high number of injuries, compared to other occupations. This includes those working in construction, the fire brigade and the prison service.

BEVA has produced the new guidelines ‘by vets for horse vets’. They include contributions and views from BEVA members and are intended for all those handling and involved with veterinary care.

The guidelines encourage workers to consider the steps they can take to make their activities as safe as possible. They also outline how to make ‘on the spot’ risk assessments and when to stop if a procedure becomes unsafe.

The accompanying leaflet, Signs of Increased Arousal Combined with a Negative Effective State, is written by equine vet and behaviourist Gemma Pearson. It explains signs of increased arousal in horses, including facial expressions, stance, movement and response.

“The new guidelines have been carefully developed to ensure that they are as pertinent, pragmatic and helpful for vets in practice,” said David Montford, CEO of BEVA. “Hopefully they will help to make the equine veterinary world a little safer.”

Image (C) BEVA

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New DNA testing scheme for the Russian black terrier

News Story 1
 A new DNA testing scheme for juvenile laryngeal paralysis and polyneuropathy (JLPP) in the Russian black terrier has been approved by The Kennel Club.

JLPP is a genetic disease that affects the nerves. In affected dogs, it starts with the nerve that supplies the muscles of the larynx leading to muscle weakness and laryngeal paralysis.

To find out which laboratories the Kennel Club is able to record results from, and which labs will send results direct to the Kennel Club, visit thekennelclub.org.uk.

 

News Shorts
Feline art marks 90 years of Cats Protection

Sussex-based charity Cats Protection is hosting a prestigious art exhibition to mark its 90th anniversary.

More than 200 paintings provided by members of the Society of Feline Artists will go on show at the charity's National Cat Centre in Chelwood Gate (28 April - 7 May).

"Art enthusiasts, students and cat lovers alike will all enjoy the exhibition, and we hope it will also inspire some of our younger visitors to get sketching," said Cats Protection's director of fundraising, Lewis Coghlin.