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BEVA publishes new safety guidance for equine vets
WW1 US army veterinary surgeons prepare for surgery.

Booklet outlines how to make ‘on the spot’ risk assessments

New guidelines to help veterinary practitioners stay safe around equines have been published by the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA).

The nine-page booklet is available to download at beva.org.uk/workplacesafety together with a practical, illustrated leaflet on spotting some of the warning signs a horse might display.

The guidelines follow the publication of a BEVA report, which revealed that vets can expect to sustain seven to eight work-related injuries over the course of a 30-year-working life.

Furthermore, figures released by the Health & Safety Executive show that vets sustain a remarkably high number of injuries, compared to other occupations. This includes those working in construction, the fire brigade and the prison service.

BEVA has produced the new guidelines ‘by vets for horse vets’. They include contributions and views from BEVA members and are intended for all those handling and involved with veterinary care.

The guidelines encourage workers to consider the steps they can take to make their activities as safe as possible. They also outline how to make ‘on the spot’ risk assessments and when to stop if a procedure becomes unsafe.

The accompanying leaflet, Signs of Increased Arousal Combined with a Negative Effective State, is written by equine vet and behaviourist Gemma Pearson. It explains signs of increased arousal in horses, including facial expressions, stance, movement and response.

“The new guidelines have been carefully developed to ensure that they are as pertinent, pragmatic and helpful for vets in practice,” said David Montford, CEO of BEVA. “Hopefully they will help to make the equine veterinary world a little safer.”

Image (C) BEVA

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Practices urged to support #vets4vultures

News Story 1
 Veterinary professionals are being urged to take part in the #vets4vultures online fundraising campaign. Vultures are persecuted throughout the world and numbers of some species have fallen by 99.9 per cent in recent years. Wildlife Vets International rescue and rehabilitate the birds of prey, as well as training local vets. However, the charity needs to raise £18,000 for its conservation plans to go ahead next year.

It has been selected for The Big Christmas Give Challenge, which goes live on 28 November. To help practices encourage clients to get involved, there is an online promotional pack containing resources for websites and social media platforms.

For more information emailinfo@wildlifevetsinternational  

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