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BSAVA joins 'beat the bugs' alliance
pills
"The threat of AMR isn't news to doctors, pharmacists, dentists or vets, but it also isn't going away."
Family-friendly video aims to raise awareness of AMR
 
The BSAVA has joined forces with pan-professional colleagues to establish an antimicrobial resistance alliance, that aims to prevent the spread of resistant infections through effective communication, education and training.

A new 'beat the bugs' video for families has been produced by the Bella Moss Foundation, a charity that promotes sensible use of antimicrobials and good hygiene in human and veterinary medicine.

The video, launched to mark the start of World Antibiotic Awareness Week (14-20 November), explains how children and their families can play their part in protecting our antibiotics.

Antibiotic resistance is an international one health concern. A support service run by Bella Moss receives at least 30 calls a week from human and animal clinicians, as well as pet owners battling antimicrobial infections.

Charity founder Jill Moss said: "The threat of AMR isn't news to doctors, pharmacists, dentists or vets, but it also isn't going away.

"In 2015 AMR was recognised as the potential source of a future civil emergency on the Government's national risk register, and earlier this year, the former Prime Minister's Review on AMR said if we don't act, by 2050 we could see 10 million global deaths every year caused by superbugs.

"That same report also said a real effort was needed to raise public awareness of AMR."

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New DNA testing scheme for the Russian black terrier

News Story 1
 A new DNA testing scheme for juvenile laryngeal paralysis and polyneuropathy (JLPP) in the Russian black terrier has been approved by The Kennel Club.

JLPP is a genetic disease that affects the nerves. In affected dogs, it starts with the nerve that supplies the muscles of the larynx leading to muscle weakness and laryngeal paralysis.

To find out which laboratories the Kennel Club is able to record results from, and which labs will send results direct to the Kennel Club, visit thekennelclub.org.uk.

 

News Shorts
Feline art marks 90 years of Cats Protection

Sussex-based charity Cats Protection is hosting a prestigious art exhibition to mark its 90th anniversary.

More than 200 paintings provided by members of the Society of Feline Artists will go on show at the charity's National Cat Centre in Chelwood Gate (28 April - 7 May).

"Art enthusiasts, students and cat lovers alike will all enjoy the exhibition, and we hope it will also inspire some of our younger visitors to get sketching," said Cats Protection's director of fundraising, Lewis Coghlin.