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BSAVA joins 'beat the bugs' alliance
pills
"The threat of AMR isn't news to doctors, pharmacists, dentists or vets, but it also isn't going away."
Family-friendly video aims to raise awareness of AMR
 
The BSAVA has joined forces with pan-professional colleagues to establish an antimicrobial resistance alliance, that aims to prevent the spread of resistant infections through effective communication, education and training.

A new 'beat the bugs' video for families has been produced by the Bella Moss Foundation, a charity that promotes sensible use of antimicrobials and good hygiene in human and veterinary medicine.

The video, launched to mark the start of World Antibiotic Awareness Week (14-20 November), explains how children and their families can play their part in protecting our antibiotics.

Antibiotic resistance is an international one health concern. A support service run by Bella Moss receives at least 30 calls a week from human and animal clinicians, as well as pet owners battling antimicrobial infections.

Charity founder Jill Moss said: "The threat of AMR isn't news to doctors, pharmacists, dentists or vets, but it also isn't going away.

"In 2015 AMR was recognised as the potential source of a future civil emergency on the Government's national risk register, and earlier this year, the former Prime Minister's Review on AMR said if we don't act, by 2050 we could see 10 million global deaths every year caused by superbugs.

"That same report also said a real effort was needed to raise public awareness of AMR."

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Newborn okapi named after Meghan Markle

News Story 1
 An endangered okapi recently born at London Zoo has been named Meghan - after Prince Harry’s fiancé Meghan Markle - in celebration of the upcoming royal wedding. Okapis are classed as endangered in the wild, having suffered ongoing declines since 1995. Zookeeper Gemma Metcalf said: “We’re very pleased with how mother and baby are doing. Oni is being very attentive, making sure she regularly licks her clean and keeping a watchful eye over Meghan as she sleeps.” Image © ZSL London Zoo  

News Shorts
Ten new cases of Alabama rot confirmed

Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists has confirmed 10 new cases of Alabama rot, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in the UK to 122.

In a Facebook post, the referral centre said the cases were from County Durham, West Yorkshire, Greater Manchester, Staffordshire, Sussex, West Somerset, Devon, and Powys.

Pet owners are urged to remain vigilant and seek advice from their vet if their dog develops unexplained skin lesions/sores.