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RVC issues warning over microchip case
microchip in dog's brain
An exemption certificate can be provided in cases where, in the vet's professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

Vets highlight potential complications of microchipping small dogs
 
Small animal neurologists at the RVC's Queen Mother Hospital for Animals are highlighting the potential complications associated with microchipping very small dogs, following a recent case.

A seven-week-old female Chihuahua, weighing just 750g, was referred to the hospital after a microchip was accidentally placed through the caudal aspect of the skull, into the rostral brainstem. Due to the chip's location, the decision was made to leave it in place.

The puppy initially showed marked neurological dysfunction as a result of traumatic brain injury, but since then a remarkable improvement has been observed and vets say there is no apparent compromise to the animal's welfare.

The microchip was placed by an implanter, trained and approved under section nine of the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015. The regulations, which came into force in April of this year, make it a legal requirement for all dogs to be microchipped by the age of eight weeks.

Writing in Vet Record, neurologists said they wanted to raise awareness of the certificate of exemption, which is available from Defra. The certificate can be provided by a veterinary surgeon in cases where, in their professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

They advised implanters to seek the advice of a veterinary surgeon if they are unsure about the suitability of a dog for microchip implantation.

Image © RVC

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Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

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News Shorts
BEVA survey seeks views about antibiotic use in horses

Equine vets are being invited to participate in a BEVA survey that aims to find out more about antimicrobial resistance in equine veterinary practice.

Designed by researchers at the University of Liverpool and incoming BEVA president Tim Mair, the survey aims to fill gaps in knowledge about how antimicrobials are being used in equine practice and the landscape of resistant infections encountered in equine practice.

Researchers hope the results will lead to a greater understanding of the role of antimicrobial treatment and antimicrobial resistance in horses and protect antibiotics for the future of equine and human health.