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Labour calls for review of ‘driven’ grouse shooting
“There are viable alternatives to grouse shooting such as simulated shooting and wildlife tourism."

Review ‘should look at alternatives and environmental impacts’

The Labour Party has called for a review of ‘driven’ grouse shooting, to explore its economic and environmental impacts, and consider viable alternatives.

Labour’s shadow environment secretary, Sue Hayman MP, called for the review on 12 August - known as the Glorious Twelfth - which marks the beginning of the four-month grouse shooting season.

Driven shooting is the most common mode of hunting grouse and involves a row of people (beaters) walking and pushing the grouse over a line of guns concealed in grouse butts.

Suggested alternatives include simulated shooting and wildlife tourism.

Sue Hayman said: “The costs of grouse shooting on our environment and wildlife needs to be to properly weighed up against the benefit of land owners profiting from shooting parties. For too long the Tories have bent the knee to land owners and it’s our environment and our people who pay the price.

“There are viable alternatives to grouse shooting such as simulated shooting and wildlife tourism. The time has come for a proper review into the practice.”
Labour’s call for a review will be included in its Animal Welfare Manifesto, to be launched at the end of August.

The British Association for Shooting & Conservation responded in a statement: ‘… The Labour review needs to hear from the people on the ground who maintain grouse moors with massive benefits for conservation and the environment.

'When they’ve heard the facts we expect Labour to support the massive economic benefits to marginal upland communities that grouse shooting delivers.’

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Regional Representatives nominations sought

News Story 1
 Seven new regional representatives are being sought by the British Veterinary Association (BVA) to speak for vets from those regions and to represent their views to BVA Council.

The opportunities are available in in the North-East, Yorkshire & Humber, East Midlands, West Midlands, London, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Representatives from all sectors of the veterinary profession are urged to apply.

BVA president Daniella Dos Santos, said: "Our regional representatives are integral to that mission and to the activities of Council - contributing to effective horizon scanning on matters of veterinary policy and providing an informed steer to BVA’s Policy Committee.” 

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Livestock Antibody Hub receives funding boost

The Pirbright Institute has received US $5.5 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to form a Livestock Antibody Hub aimed at supporting animal and human health. The work will bring together researchers from across the UK utilise research outcomes in livestock disease and immunology.

Dr Doug Brown, chief executive of the British Society for Immunology, commented: “The UK is a world leader in veterinary immunology research, and this transformative investment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will drive the next chapter of innovation in developing new treatments and prevention options against livestock diseases".