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£3.5m funding given to global wildlife projects
One of the successful projects will use radar devices to track albatrosses in the south Atlantic.

Darwin Plus awards funding to 17 schemes in UK Overseas Territories 

Rare species and iconic landscapes around the world will receive protection through the UK government, after £3.5 million was awarded to 17 innovative projects.

The Darwin Plus initiative is awarding funding to a diverse array of projects in UK Overseas Territories - from radar tracking albatrosses in the south Atlantic, to protecting wetlands in the Caribbean and monitoring drivers of change in the Akrotiri wetlands on Cyprus.

Minister of state for the Overseas Territories, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, said: “The UK’s Overseas Territories have some of the world’s most pristine waters and natural environments, from the polar regions to the Pacific, and we are committed to doing all we can to preserve them.

“This funding will help conservation projects continue their good work, boosting protections for wildlife in areas including the Atlantic and the Caribbean and supporting sustainable livelihoods which will preserve our precious environment for future generations.”

Professor Stephen Blackmore, chair of the Darwin Plus Advisory Group, added: “The range of the projects funded by Darwin Plus in our UK Overseas Territories shows how we can effect change and better support and protect nature around the globe.

“I am proud that we are delivering Darwin Plus funding to benefit animal and plant species and their habitats, which are vital to humanity’s economic and social development.”

Image © Liam Quinn/CC BY-SA 2.0/Wikimedia Commons
 

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Endangered turtles rescued from smugglers

News Story 1
 A group of endangered turtles have found a new home at London Zoo after being rescued from smugglers.

The four big-headed turtles arrived at the zoo at the end of last year, after smugglers tried to illegally import them to Canada, labelled as toys.

One of the turtles, named Lady Triệu after a Vietnamese warrioress, has moved to a new exhibit in the zoo’s reptile house. She is the only one of her kind in a UK zoo.

Big-headed turtles have such large heads that they cannot pull them back into their shells. To compensate, they have armour plating from head to tail and a very sharp beak to fend off predators. They are ranked number 18 on ZSL’s EDGE of Existence reptile list, which puts threatened species at the forefront of conservation action. Image © ZSL  

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RCVS Fellowship board chair elections get underway

Voting for the 2019 RCVS Fellowship Chair election is now underway. This year four candidates are standing for election, including Dr Robert Huey, Professor John Innes, Professor Liz Mossop and Professor Ian Ramsey.

The Chair will attend and preside over Fellowship meetings and take the lead in consolidating the Fellowship’s position as the learned society of the RCVS. Fellows will receive an email containing a link to the online voting form, as well as candidates’ details and manifestos. Voting closes at 5pm on Thursday, 5 September.