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Ban on third-party puppy and kitten sales confirmed
"This is a real victory for grassroots campaigners as well as the UK’s dogs and cats" - Marc Abraham.
Anyone planning to adopt a cat or dog under six months must deal with breeder or rehoming centre

Third-party sales of puppies and kittens will be banned under new legislation announced by the government.

The ban, known as ‘Lucy’s Law’, means that anyone planning to buy or adopt a puppy or kitten under six months must deal directly with the breeder or with an animal rehoming centre.  

Campaigners hope it will bring an end to puppy farming and make it harder for high volume low welfare breeders - both licensed and unlicensed - which are reliant on third-party sellers.

Animal welfare minister David Rutley said: “This ban on third-party sales of puppies and kittens is part of our commitment to make sure the nation’s much-loved pets get the right start in life.

“I pay tribute to the Lucy’s Law campaign and the many stakeholders who have passionately campaigned for this ban. Today’s decision builds on our previous action in this area, including banning the sale of puppies under eight weeks and tackling the breeding of dogs with genetic disorders.”

Lucy’s Law campaign founder and TV vet Marc Abraham said: “This is a real victory for grassroots campaigners as well as the UK’s dogs and cats. On behalf of my phenomenal Lucy’s Law team I thank the government, and every animal lover, ethical animal welfare organisation, parliamentarian, and celebrity that’s helped make Lucy’s Law’s ban on third-party puppy and kitten sales a reality.”

The decision was taken following a public consultation, from which there was more than 95 per cent support for a ban.

Battersea’s chief executive Claire Horton said: “Battersea welcomes today’s government confirmation that third-party sales of puppies and kittens will be banned. Properly enforced, this will help put an end to dogs being used as breeding machines and kept in shocking conditions.

“The days of unscrupulous puppy dealers lining their pockets with no regard for animal welfare must now come to an end. This ban makes breeders properly accountable for the puppies they produce and will now give future owners the reassurance that they can adopt their new dog or cat from a safe and trusted source and ideally from a rescue centre.”

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Nominations for 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards now open

News Story 1
 People across the UK are being urged to nominate a standout animal champion for the 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards.

The awards recognise those who have worked tirelessly to improve animal welfare, campaigned on behalf of animals, or shown true bravery. Previous winners include comedian John Bishop, who was awarded Celebrity Animal Champion of the Year, and 11-year-old Lobby Cantwell, who raised more than £1,000 for the charity through mountain climbs and bike rides.

To submit a nomination or find out more about the awards visit the RSPCA website. Nominations will remain open until 4 pm on Friday, March 15.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
New £1m project to investigate dairy cow lameness

Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) is leading a new £1 million research project to investigate the causes of lameness in dairy cows.

One in three dairy cows are affected by lameness every day in the UK, costing the industry an estimated £250 milion annually.

The project will take three years to complete and is due to finish by November 2021.

Professor Georgios Banos of SRUC commented: “In addition to pain and discomfort to the animal, lameness is associated with decreased milk production and inflated farm costs.

“Among cows raised in the same environment, some become lame while others do not. Understanding the reasons behind this will help us develop targeted preventive practices contributing to enhanced animal welfare and farm profitability.”