Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Deadly fungus could spread to UK newts, scientists say
The private trade in amphibians could result in Bsal spreading to wild populations of newts and salamanders in the UK.

Bsal ‘impossible to stop’ once in a wild population 

A deadly fungus that has decimated salamander populations could soon find its way to the UK, scientists are warning.

New research suggests that Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) is widespread in private amphibian collections in Western Europe.

Seven out of 11 collections tested positive for the fungus, according to findings published in Scientific Reports.

The infection has been transmitted between several countries and was discovered in Spain for the first time.

Scientists said they are concerned about the private trade in amphibians, as it could result in Bsal spreading to wild populations of newts and salamanders in the UK, with dire results for conservation.

Lead author Liam Fitzpatrick from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), said: “Once the fungus is in a wild population it is likely to be impossible to stop its spread and the loss of susceptible species.

“We already know that Bsal can be lethal to a number of European salamander species, so understanding ways in which the fungus could be introduced to new areas is essential in our efforts to conserve wild amphibians.”

Bsal was responsible for a 99 per cent decline in one monitored population of fire salamanders in the Netherlands. Population declines have since expanded into Belgium and Germany.

Professor Andrew Cunningham, also from ZSL, said the “critical point” is to prevent Bsal from being introduced to collections in the first place.

It is estimated that 131,000 live amphibians were imported to the UK in 2006, with 98 per cent used for the legal pet trade.

Co-author Professor An Martel from Ghent University said: “Screening captive collections and treating Bsal positive individuals, along with engaging with collectors to improve sanitary protocols, are likely to be the most effective and feasible measures to protect both captive and wild salamanders and newts from Bsal.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Huge spike in ‘designer’ dogs going into rescue

News Story 1
 The RSPCA has reported a huge spike in the number of ‘designer’ dogs arriving into its care.

Figures published by the charity show there has been a 517 per cent increase in the number of French bulldogs arriving into its kennels. During that time, the charity has also seen an increase in dachshunds, chihuahuas, and crossbreeds.

RSPCA dog welfare expert Lisa Hens said: “We know that the breeds of dog coming into our care often reflect the trends in dog ownership in the wider world and, at the moment, it doesn’t get more trendy than ‘designer’ dogs like French bulldogs and Dachshunds."

 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
New shearing guidance for farmers and contractors

Industry bodies have produced guidance for farmers and contractors on how to handle sheep during shearing to avoid stress and injury.

The guidance includes every step - from the presentation of sheep and facilities for shearing, through to using a contractor and shearers - and aims to ensure shearing is carried out safely, efficiently and with high standards of animal welfare.

Guide co-author Jill Hewitt from the NAAC said: “Shearing is a professional job that takes significant skill. Shearers take their responsibility to protect animal welfare very seriously and it will be a positive step to remind everyone of the importance of working together.’