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'Tongue worm' reported in imported dogs
dog
'Veterinary practitioners should be alert to the possibility of L serrata, particularly in imported dogs.'
Vets advised to be vigilant for potentially zoonotic parasite
 
Parasitologists are warning vets to be alert for cases of tongue worm (Linguatula serrata) in the UK after a number of recent cases in stray dogs imported from Romania.

The parasite is potentially zoonotic and there have been reports of rare human cases involving parasite localisation in the eye.

Writing in Vet Record (179, 10), a group of UK experts advised the uptake of strict hygiene measures for handling pets if the parasite is confirmed or suspected. Eggs can be expelled from the mouth, nose or faeces, and may contaminate the pet's coat.

The authors wrote: 'Veterinary practitioners should be alert to the possibility of L serrata, particularly in imported dogs, and should treat appropriately and provide the correct advice to owners.'

Infected dogs may be asymptomatic or have mucopurulent nasal discharge, epistaxis and sneezing. The adult parasite is an elongated tongue shape and large in size - males are up to 20mm and females 30-130mm long. It is found in the nasal cavities or sinuses in dogs, foxes and other canids.

Animals become infected by eating raw offal from infected intermediate hosts, such as sheep, goats, cattle, rabbits and horses. The parasite has previously been reported in foxes in the UK, but the recent cases were in dogs imported from Romania, where dogs are commonly fed raw meat.

Treatment may involve nasal flushing with warm salty water to help detach the parasites. Screening of eggs in nasal flushes could also be carried out to identify them. Surgical removal may not be appropriate as the parasites can attach to the sinuses.

In Romania, macrocyclic lactones are used for treatment. There is also a report of parasite expulsion after milbemycin oxime treatment in a dog.  

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Registrations open for overseas veterinary professionals course

News Story 1
 Registrations are now open for the RCVS CPD course for overseas veterinary professionals, which covers an introduction to the UK veterinary professions.

The course is aimed at overseas-qualified veterinary surgeons and nurses during their first two years of working in the UK, in addition to those considering working here. It provides graduates with the key information and skills required to practice in the UK, as well as helping them understand their legal duties as veterinary professionals.

For more information and to book your place please click here. The course will be held at Belgravia House, London, on Wednesday 12 June.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BVA launches award to celebrate young vets

A new award has been launched to celebrate inspirational young vets who are making a difference in their day to day work.

Nominations are now open for the BVA Young Vet of the Year Award, which is the first of its kind. It is open to all vets registered with the RCVS in the first eight years of their careers, working in any veterinary sphere, including clinical practice, research, education or veterinary politics. Organisers are looking for an ‘exceptional young vet’ whose work has benefitted the veterinary community or the workplace.

The awards are open for self-entry and nominations by 1 August 2019. The winner will be announced at London Vet Show on 14 November 2019, where a £1000 cash prize will be awarded, alongside a ‘career enhancing experience’ with Zoetis.